Industrial Control Panels for North America

UL Information

What is UL about?

UL (Underwriters Laboratories Inc.®) is one of the world’s leading organizations for testing and certification in the field of product safety. This independent US organization was founded in 1894 at the request of American fire insurance companies to analyze the fire hazards posed by electrically operated devices.

Today, UL tests and certifies the most varying materials, components and end products for their operational safety, particularly with regard to potential personal injury and fire formation.

The organization maintains subsidiaries in numerous European countries. Detailed information on the US organization as well as contact details for the various European subsidiaries are also available on the Internet at www.ul.com.


Underwriters Laboratories

UL Standards

The IEC standards stated here serve as orientation. A one-to-one comparison of IEC and UL standards is not possible.

US Standard

Approximate IEC standard

NEC =NFPA 70

National Electrical Code (NEC)

Installation standard for the USA; all electrical installations shall comply with this code; the NEC is generally applied by local inspectors (Authority Having Jurisdiction, AHJ) and revised every 3 years

IEC 60364-1

NFPA 79

Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery

The "Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery" is mainly applied in the automotive and machine tool industry.

IEC 60204-1

UL 508A

Industrial Control Panels

Standard for industrial control panels

IEC 60204-1

UL 489

Molded-Case Circuit-Breakers, Molded-Case Switches and Circuit-Breaker Enclosures

Standard for power distribution equipment, e. g. molded-case circuit breakers / MCCBs, miniature circuit breakers / MCBs, molded-case switches and instantaneous trip circuit breakers

IEC 60947-2

UL 508

Industrial Control Equipment

Standard for industrial control equipment, e. g. contactors, overload relays, PLCs, etc.

Text

UL 98

Enclosed and Dead Front Switches

Standard for enclosed and dead-front switches,e.g. disconnectors, main switches

IEC 60947-3

UL 248

Low-Voltage Fuses

Standard for fuses with fuse holder UL 4248

UL 60947-1

Low-Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear

General Rules

IEC 60947-1

UL 60947-4-1

Low-Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear

Contactors and motor-starters - Electromechanical contactors and motor-starters

IEC 60947-4-1


UL Marks

UL Listing Mark: This is one of the most common UL Marks. If a product carries this Mark, it means UL found that representative samples of this product met UL‘s safety requirements. These requirements are primarily based on UL‘s own published Standards for Safety. This type of Mark is seen commonly on appliances and computer equipment, furnaces and heaters, fuses, electrical panel boards, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, fire extinguishers and sprinkler systems, personal flotation devices like life jackets and life preservers, bullet resistant glass, and thousands of other products.

C-UL Listing Mark: This mark is applied to products for the Canadian market. The products with this type of mark have been evaluated to Canadian safety requirements, which may be somewhat different from U.S. safety requirements. You will see this type of Mark on appliances and computer equipment, vending machines, household burglar alarm systems, lighting fixtures, and many other types of products.

C-UL US Listing Mark: UL introduced this new Listing Mark in early 1998. It indicates compliance with both Canadian and U.S. requirements. The Canada/U.S. UL Mark is optional. UL encourages those manufacturers with products certified for both countries to use this new, combined Mark, but they may continue using separate UL Marks for the United States and Canada.

Recognized Component Mark: These mark consumers rarely see because it is specifically used on component parts that are part of a larger product or system. These components may have restrictions on their performance or may be incomplete in construction. The Component Recognition marking is found on a wide range of products, including some switches, power supplies, printed wiring boards, some kinds of industrial control equipment and thousands of other products. They shall only be installed by experts of the manufacturer according to the so-called “Conditions of Acceptability (CoA)” apply to these devices. Amongst others, our portfolio contains the following products with UR mark: miniature circuit breakers according to UL 1077, time switches according to UL 917 and SITOR fuses.

Canadian Recognized Component Mark: Similar as the Recognized Mark (see above). Products intended for Canada carry the Recognized Component mark "C".

Text

Recognized Component Mark for Canada and the United States: This new UL Recognized Component Mark, which became effective April 1, 1998, may be used on components certified by UL to both Canadian and U.S. requirements. Although UL had not originally planned to introduce a combined Recognized Component Mark, the popularity of the Canada/U.S. Listing and Classification Marks among clients with UL certifications for both Canada and the United States has led to the new Mark.

Certifications such as UL are issued by the so-called NRTLs (Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories) after successful testing. The OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has accredited Underwriters Laboratories Inc. as NRTL

UL Classification (CCN)

The abbreviation CCN stands for Category Control Number. It comprises 4 letters or 4 letters plus 1 number that indicate the product category or the application for which a device may be used.

Example: 3WL air circuit breaker
WJAZ and DIVQ are classification codes for 3WL circuit breakers according to the UL 489 Standard, "Molded-Case Circuit Breakers, Molded-Case Switches and Circuit-Breaker Enclosures".

The details are defined by the CCN:

WJAZ:

Suitable for disconnect in the feeder circuit and as short circuit protection in the branch circuit

DIVQ:

Suitable for disconnect and protection in the feeder circuit and as short circuit protection in the branch circuit

Meaning of the additional number (5th position) for the most common test marks

No number,
only 4 letters

Listed Product for USA
Testing / acceptance by a recognized NRTL according to the relevant standards.

Number 2

Recognized Product for USA
Testing / acceptance by a recognized NRTL according to the relevant standards.

Number 7

Listed Product for Canada
Testing / acceptance by a recognized NRTL according to the relevant UL standards for Canada (not the same as for the USA).

Number 8

Recognized Product for Canada
Testing / acceptance by a recognized NRTL according to the relevant UL standards for Canada (not the same as for the USA).


UL Glossary

Approvals

The products that are used are almost always required to have UL approval. This approval / testing is carried out by an NRTL (National Recognized Test Laboratory).

SCCR

An industrial control panel must be marked with a so-called SCCR - Short Circuit Current Rating. In the IEC, this approximately corresponds to the I cw value of the switchboard.

UL Classification (CCN)

The abbreviation CCN stands for Category Control Number. It comprises 4 letters or 4 letters plus 1 number that indicate the product category or the application for which a device may be used.

Example: 3WL air circuit breaker
WJAZ and DIVQ are classification codes for 3WL circuit breakers according to the UL 489 Standard, "Molded-Case Circuit Breakers, Molded-Case Switches and Circuit-Breaker Enclosures".

The details are defined by the CCN:

WJAZ:

Suitable for disconnect in the feeder circuit and as short-circuit protection in the branch circuit

DIVQ:

Suitable for disconnect and protection in the feeder circuit and as short-circuit protection in the branch circuit

UL File Number

The UL File Number refers to the report in which the device is listed / recognized. It is a unique number that is assigned to one manufacturer and one device type. It must be specified in the UL submission for an industrial control panel.

UL Marks

The marking on UL approved products makes a fundamental distinction between "listed devices" and "recognized components". There are also separate versions for the Canadian and the combined Canadian / US market.

05/15/2013 | Author: Danish Bhimani

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